Leadership & Staff

Leadership & Staff

  • Profile Image
  • Xiaojue Wang
  • Graduate Program Director
  • Degree: B.A., MA., Peking; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia
  • Specialty: Modern and contemporary Chinese and Sinophone literature; the cultural Cold War; Chinese-German intellectual connections; cultural memories; film and media studies; gender and sexuality
  • Personal Website
  • 326 Scott Hall
  • Biography:

    Xiaojue Wang is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures and Director of Graduate Studies in the Program in Comparative Literature. Her research interests are Chinese literature and culture from late imperial to contemporary periods, cultural Cold War studies in global Asias, Chinese-German intellectual connections, cultural memories, film and media studies, gender and sexuality, and comparative literature. She is the author of Modernity with a Cold War Face: Reimagining the Nation in Chinese Literature across the 1949 Divide (Harvard University Asia Center, 2013), which examines the diverse, dynamic cultural practices in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and overseas across the 1949 Chinese divide, and re-positions modern Chinese literature in the global context of the Cold War.

    Professor Wang is currently completing her second book, tentatively entitled The Edges of Literature: Eileen Chang and the Aesthetics of Deviation, which seeks to chart the Cold War cultural geography in the transpacific and global Asias. Centering on the prominent bilingual woman writer Eileen Chang, this study explores how Chang maneuvered between art and politics; colonialism, modernization, and cosmopolitanism; migration and expatriation; as well as high art, popular culture, and technology.

    Her work has appeared in Verge: Studies in Global Asias, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture, Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews (CLEAR), and MCLC Modern Chinese Literature and Culture, and numerous Chinese-language journals including Twenty-First Century, Modern Chinese Literature Studies, Dushu, Foreign Literature Review, etc. She is also the Chinese translator or co-translator of Jürgen Habermas’ Strukturwandel der Öffentlichkeit, Horkheimer Reader, Andreas Huyssen’s After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture, Postmodernism, and John Fiske’s Understanding Popular Culture, among others.

V. G. Julie Rajan

Undergraduate Program Director

Julie Rajan is Associate Teaching Professor and Director of the Masters Program in the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Rutgers University-NB; and a member of the Affiliate Faculty and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Program in Comparative Literature at Rutgers University-NB. Her research interests include: women’s human rights; women and violence in conflict; colonial, post-colonial, and modern-day imperialisms; and terrorism and resistance.

Her monographs include: Women Suicide Bombers: Narratives of Violence (2011); Al Qaeda’s Global Crisis: The Islamic State, Takfir, and the Genocide of Muslims (2015); and Women, Violence, and the Islamic State: Resurrecting the Caliphate through Femicide (forthcoming 2021). She has co-edited and edited a number of collections and special issues, including: Violence and Gender in the Globalized World (2008); Human Rights in Postcolonial India (2016); and The United States, Security, and Human Rights: Extra-Ordinary ‘Justice’ in the Post-9/11 Era, Special Issue for The Security Journal (March 2015).

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Director of the Graduate Program
in Comparative Literature

Professor Levine 19th-2ist century German, French and Comparative Literature, literary theory, and intellectual history.

His research focuses on four major areas: intersections among literary, philosophical and psychoanalytic discourses; the legal and political legacies of Nuremberg; trauma and the poetics of witnessing; and Kafka and world literature.

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Before coming to Rutgers, Fatimah worked as an Administrative Assistant in the Educational Opportunity Fund Program (EOF), at College of Saint Elizabeth in Morristown, NJ. She earned a B.A. in Communication with a minor in Journalism and a M.S. in Organizational Change in Business Management from (CSE).

During her 13-year tenure in EOF, She served as a building marshal, played a key role in the mission and values committee for the college, assisted in their budget committee, and used her journalistic skills to work as one of the editors, reporter, and writers for the college’s newspaper “The Station.”

Now at Rutgers she says, “I feel excited experiencing so much diversity among the student body and faculty in Comparative Literature and across the university”. She adds, “I love working with students from different cultural backgrounds.” One of her goals is to continue to grow and learn at Rutgers. She plans to obtain her Ed.D. at Rutgers in the near future. Fatimah looks forward to having a long extended career at Rutgers.

  • Profile Image
  • Xiaojue Wang
  • Graduate Program Director
  • Biography:

    Xiaojue Wang is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures and Director of Graduate Studies in the Program in Comparative Literature. Her research interests are Chinese literature and culture from late imperial to contemporary periods, cultural Cold War studies in global Asias, Chinese-German intellectual connections, cultural memories, film and media studies, gender and sexuality, and comparative literature. She is the author of Modernity with a Cold War Face: Reimagining the Nation in Chinese Literature across the 1949 Divide (Harvard University Asia Center, 2013), which examines the diverse, dynamic cultural practices in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and overseas across the 1949 Chinese divide, and re-positions modern Chinese literature in the global context of the Cold War.

    Professor Wang is currently completing her second book, tentatively entitled The Edges of Literature: Eileen Chang and the Aesthetics of Deviation, which seeks to chart the Cold War cultural geography in the transpacific and global Asias. Centering on the prominent bilingual woman writer Eileen Chang, this study explores how Chang maneuvered between art and politics; colonialism, modernization, and cosmopolitanism; migration and expatriation; as well as high art, popular culture, and technology.

    Her work has appeared in Verge: Studies in Global Asias, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture, Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews (CLEAR), and MCLC Modern Chinese Literature and Culture, and numerous Chinese-language journals including Twenty-First Century, Modern Chinese Literature Studies, Dushu, Foreign Literature Review, etc. She is also the Chinese translator or co-translator of Jürgen Habermas’ Strukturwandel der Öffentlichkeit, Horkheimer Reader, Andreas Huyssen’s After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture, Postmodernism, and John Fiske’s Understanding Popular Culture, among others.

Xiaojue Wang

Graduate Program Director

Degree: B.A., M.A. Peking University; M.Phil., Ph.D. Columbia University

Specialty: Modern and contemporary Chinese and Sinophone literature; the cultural Cold War; Chinese-German intellectual connections; cultural memories; film and media studies; gender and sexuality

Personal Website

Biography: Xiaojue Wang is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures and Director of Graduate Studies in the Program in Comparative Literature. Her research interests are Chinese literature and culture from late imperial to contemporary periods, cultural Cold War studies in global Asias, Chinese-German intellectual connections, cultural memories, film and media studies, gender and sexuality, and comparative literature. She is the author of Modernity with a Cold War Face: Reimagining the Nation in Chinese Literature across the 1949 Divide (Harvard University Asia Center, 2013), which examines the diverse, dynamic cultural practices in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and overseas across the 1949 Chinese divide, and re-positions modern Chinese literature in the global context of the Cold War.

Professor Wang is currently completing her second book, tentatively entitled The Edges of Literature: Eileen Chang and the Aesthetics of Deviation, which seeks to chart the Cold War cultural geography in the transpacific and global Asias. Centering on the prominent bilingual woman writer Eileen Chang, this study explores how Chang maneuvered between art and politics; colonialism, modernization, and cosmopolitanism; migration and expatriation; as well as high art, popular culture, and technology.

Her work has appeared in Verge: Studies in Global Asias, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture, Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews (CLEAR), and MCLC Modern Chinese Literature and Culture, and numerous Chinese-language journals including Twenty-First Century, Modern Chinese Literature Studies, Dushu, Foreign Literature Review, etc. She is also the Chinese translator or co-translator of Jürgen Habermas’ Strukturwandel der Öffentlichkeit, Horkheimer Reader, Andreas Huyssen’s After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture, Postmodernism, and John Fiske’s Understanding Popular Culture, among others.

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