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Faculty Spotlight

NEWS FLASH: We thank Elin Diamond, Professor of English, for 6 great years of service as Graduate Director/Chair of Comparative Literature and we welcome Michael Levine, Professor of German and Comparative Literature, as new Graduate Director/Chair. We welcome back Professor Jorge Marcone to a second 3-year term as Undergraduate Director

Congratulations to the following faculty:

EDYTA BOJANOWSKA has received the 2013-2014 ACLS Burkhardt Fellowship and will spend the year in residence at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Her work in Comparative Literature was recently featured in the Rutgers article "Chekhov, Tolstoy, and Beyond".                                         MICHAEL G. LEVINE has published a book entitled "A Weak Messianic Power: Figures of a Time to Come in Benjamin, Derrida and Celan" (Fordham UP, 2013).                                                 SUSAN MARTIN-MÁRQUEZ, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature, has won National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for 2013-2014.
BEN. SIFUENTES-JÁUREGUI, Professor of American Studies and Comparative Literature, has received the Warren I. Susman award for Excellence in Teaching in 2013.

SPECIAL CONGRATULATIONS to MARILYN TANKIEWICZ, Administrative Assistant in Comparative Literature, who has won the Graduate School-New Brunswick Staff Excellence Award for 2013. Way to go, Marilyn!!

Graduate Student Spotlight

Comparative Literature congratulates DR. SHIRLI SELA-LEVAVI, who successfully defended her dissertation entitled "Guests in their Own Homes: Homecoming, Memory and Authorship in A Guest for the Night by S.Y. Agnon and the Yash Novels by Jacob Glatstein".

Congratulations also to:

DR. ALESSIO LERRO, who successfully defended his dissertation entitled" From Baroque Allegory to Romantic Sublime: Writing, Images, and Subjectivity in Tesauro, Vico, and Novalis".                    DR. MARIA KAGER, who successfully defended her dissertation entitled "The Bilingual Imagination: Joyce, Beckett, Nabokov and the Making of Modern Fiction". Maria is also the winner of a fellowship from Carolus Magnus Fonds, a division of the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds of the Netherlands, and will use the Carolus Magnus fellowship to work on a book proposal and to write two more articles.
MATTHEW MANGOLD,
winner of an "associateship" in the workshop in Scholarly and Literary Translation from Slavic Languages as well as an Individualized Research Practicum through the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center at the University of Illinois.

Congratulations to all!

Read More...

Rutgers Home
Fall 2012
FOR INTERNET COURSES SELECT:
TERM: Fall 2012
LOCATION: Rutgers Online Courses
LEVEL: Undergraduate
SUBJECT: Comparative Literature (195)

 


Fall 2012

Undergraduate Courses



Introduction to World Literature
195:101:01; Index 16433; M7 (6:40 PM-8:00)                                      BE-011; LIV
W7 (6:40 PM-8:00)                                     BE-013; LIV
Instructor:  Sokowski
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

Heroes and monsters are more than just good guys and bad guys.  By analyzing these figures, we can learn about the ideologies of the cultures in which these texts were produced.  Heroes show us what qualities are idealized in a given culture, and the paths that heroes follow also show us how these cultures imagine growing up and experiencing rites of initiation.  Monsters can show us even more.  We cannot only see what qualities are demonized, but through these figures we also read anxieties around foreign peoples, gender roles, social change and scientific discovery. 

In this course, students will be exposed to various genres from all over the world: poetry, short fiction, novels, drama, and film.  Students will learn to analyze literary figures according to the time and target culture, and will begin to read critically by discerning the ideological values implied through these figures.  
Students will be assessed through attendance/participation, a midterm exam, a research project and presentation, quizzes on the assigned reading, and a final 5-7 page comparative paper. 

Analyze arts and/or literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies.

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JANET WALKER IS THE LEAD INSTRUCTOR FOR SECTIONS 02,03,04, & H1

Introduction to World Literature - CANCELLED

195:101:02; Index 05672; T2 (9:50 AM – 11:10) MI-100; CAC
F3 (11:30 AM – 12:50) MU-115; CAC

Recitation Instructor: Beliaeva 
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

The term “world literature” can be taken to mean “literature of the whole world,” and this course aims to introduce students to outstanding works of fiction, plays, and poems from both the Western (European, North and South American), and non-Western (Chinese, Japanese, and Indian) parts of the world. In the lectures and section meetings we will focus on questions of culture, class, and gender, and on the role of translation in the study of world literature. As we read and discuss the various texts, we will try to understand how literary works from different cultures ask the question “What does it mean to be human?” All texts will be read in translation. The course will work to develop students’ skills in thinking, close reading, and writing.

The course will consist of one interactive lecture (T2) by Professor Janet Walker and one discussion section per week, as listed above.

Course Requirements:

1. (20%) Participation and short writing assignments;

2. (10%) Quizzes;

3. (40%) Two 3-4-page papers

4. (30%).5-7-page final comparative paper


Required Texts:
Euripides, Bacchae. ISBN#10-0872203921; Molière, Tartuffe and Other Plays. ISBN#10-0451530330; Morrison, Beloved. ISBN#10-307-26488-2; Sembene, Xala. ISBN#10-1556520700; and Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children. ISBN#978-0143105282. All other readings are to be found on Alexander Online Reserve. Fulfills core learning goals O and P of the Core Curriculum Arts and Humanities requirement and the SAS Global Awareness and Humanities requirement.

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Introduction to World Literature

195:101:03; Index 05002; T2 (9:50 AM – 11:10) MI-100; CAC
W3 (11:30 AM – 12:50) MU-208; CAC

Recitation Instructor:  Ulus
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp
Open only to freshmen and sophomores

The term “world literature” can be taken to mean “literature of the whole world,” and this course aims to introduce students to outstanding works of fiction, plays, and poems from both the Western (European, North and South American), and non-Western (Chinese, Japanese, and Indian) parts of the world. In the lectures and section meetings we will focus on questions of culture, class, and gender, and on the role of translation in the study of world literature. As we read and discuss the various texts, we will try to understand how literary works from different cultures ask the question “What does it mean to be human?” All texts will be read in translation. The course will work to develop students’ skills in thinking, close reading, and writing.

The course will consist of one interactive lecture (T2) by Professor Janet Walker and one discussion section per week, as listed above.

Course Requirements:

1. (20%) Participation and short writing assignments;

2. (10%) Quizzes;

3. (40%) Two 3-4-page papers

4. (30%).5-7-page final comparative paper

Required Texts:
Euripides, Bacchae. ISBN#10-0872203921; Molière, Tartuffe and Other Plays. ISBN#10-0451530330; Morrison, Beloved. ISBN#10-307-26488-2; Sembene, Xala. ISBN#10-1556520700; and Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children. ISBN#978-0143105282. All other readings are to be found on Alexander Online Reserve.

This course fulfills the goals O and P of the Core Curriculum Arts and Humanities requirement and the SAS Global Awareness and Humanities requirement.

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Introduction to World Literature

195:101:04; Index 09260; T2 (9:50 AM – 11:10) MI-100; CAC
F2 (9:50 AM – 11:10) MU-113; CAC

Recitation Instructor:  Beliaeva
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

The term “world literature” can be taken to mean “literature of the whole world,” and this course aims to introduce students to outstanding works of fiction, plays, and poems from both the Western (European, North and South American), and non-Western (Chinese, Japanese, and Indian) parts of the world. In the lectures and section meetings we will focus on questions of culture, class, and gender, and on the role of translation in the study of world literature. As we read and discuss the various texts, we will try to understand how literary works from different cultures ask the question “What does it mean to be human?” All texts will be read in translation. The course will work to develop students’ skills in thinking, close reading, and writing.

The course will consist of one interactive lecture (T2) by Professor Janet Walker and one discussion section per week, as listed above.

Course Requirements:

1. (20%) Participation and short writing assignments;

2. (10%) Quizzes;

3. (40%) Two 3-4-page papers

4. (30%).5-7-page final comparative paper

Required Texts:
Euripides, Bacchae. ISBN#10-0872203921; Molière, Tartuffe and Other Plays. ISBN#10-0451530330; Morrison, Beloved. ISBN#10-307-26488-2; Sembene, Xala. ISBN#10-1556520700; and Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children. ISBN#978-0143105282. All other readings are to be found on Alexander Online Reserve.

This course fulfills the goals O and P of the Core Curriculum Arts and Humanities requirement and the SAS Global Awareness and Humanities requirement.

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Introduction to World Literature

195:101:H1; Index 09261; T2 (9:50 AM – 11:10) MI-100; CAC
Th2 (9:50 AM – 11:10) CML-101; CAC

Instructor:  Walker, J.
Honors students only
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

The term “world literature” can be taken to mean “literature of the whole world,” and this course aims to introduce students to outstanding works of fiction, plays, and poems from both the Western (European, North and South American), and non-Western (Chinese, Japanese, and Indian) parts of the world. In the lectures and section meetings we will focus on questions of culture, class, and gender, and on the role of translation in the study of world literature. As we read and discuss the various texts, we will try to understand how literary works from different cultures ask the question “What does it mean to be human?” All texts will be read in translation. The course will work to develop students’ skills in thinking, close reading, and writing.

The course will consist of one interactive lecture (T2) by Professor Janet Walker and one discussion section per week, as listed above.

Course Requirements:

1. (20%) Participation and short writing assignments;

2. (10%) Quizzes;

3. (40%) Two 3-4-page papers

4. (30%).5-7-page final comparative paper


Required Texts:
Euripides, Bacchae. ISBN#10-0872203921; Molière, Tartuffe and Other Plays. ISBN#10-0451530330; Morrison, Beloved. ISBN#10-307-26488-2; Sembene, Xala. ISBN#10-1556520700; and Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children. ISBN#978-0143105282. All other readings are to be found on Alexander Online Reserve.

This course fulfills the goals O and P of the Core Curriculum Arts and Humanities requirement and the SAS Global Awareness and Humanities requirement.

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Introduction to Short Fiction
195:135:01; Index 04061; MW5 (2:50 PM – 4:10)                                        SC-101; CAC
Instructor:  Lee
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

Throughout the semester we will read a wide variety of short stories from many, if not all, corners of the world and learn how to appreciate each story closely, carefully, and critically paying attention to its respective and intersected contexts. In an effort to train ourselves to be a critical reader/writer, I’d like to invite you to primarily pay attention to the particular contexts of each text. At the same time, we will re-examine our position as readers in terms of our own historical, social, cultural, and political contexts. In so doing, we will be able to understand reading stories is an effective tool to encounter others, however vicariously.

To improve our capacity of close reading we will familiarize ourselves with the key elements of fiction such as plot, character, narrator, dialogue, point of view and style, and analyze the particular ways in which these elements work in each short text we examine. The limited length of short fiction requires us to be highly attentive to every particular element of it for grasping details. This might be challenging to most of us especially because of it being short and thus condensed. Yet it can be pleasing as much when we become eventually able to capture the artistry and its effects in each fiction.

Since reading fiction requires us to engage with and respond to the writer’s and the narrator’s individual and still interrelated contexts, we will always ask the following set of questions (but not limited to it) in order to delve into what runs under the seemingly transparent surface: 1) What motivates the character/narrator to act/speak as s/he does in the story? What inhibits her/him from acting/speaking in certain ways? 2) What would have been done otherwise in terms of author’s particular choice for character’s/narrator’s certain action/speech? What does author achieve by choosing certain details and not others for her/his fictional narrative? 3) What and how do particular experience and knowledge of ourselves affect our interpretation of the fictions? How does the presence of reader matter to certain fiction?

We will also examine the problem of fictiveness and realness of fiction that are seemingly incompatible by posing questions on the issue of complex relation between fictive world of text created by writer and the world we actually inhabit. Last but not least, one of our major foci will be making intimate connections between two or more texts in order to let one illuminate the other. This way of putting one text in dialogue with the other, termed a comparative approach to texts, rewards readers in that it opens up vaster realm of interpretation for the texts in question. That can help mark distinct characteristics of each text better and locate the texts in an ensemble of diverse literary relationships rather letting them being isolated on its own.

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Introduction to Short Fiction
195:135:04; Index 18047; MTh1 (8:40 AM-10:00)                                     ARC-110; BUS
Instructor:  Coleman
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

This course will explore how authors use various genres of short fiction – the short story, novella and short novel – to imagine, contest and pose alternatives to the nation. Beginning with the nineteenth century and concluding in the present moment, we will read works from different linguistic and cultural traditions, paying particular attention to how collectivities are created, challenged and recreated by fictional texts. We will discuss how various authors have dealt with concepts such as nationalism, colonialism and postcolonialism, transnationalism and exile in their fiction, focusing on the special role that short fiction plays in imagining those collectivities. Questions we will ask include: what is distinct about the short story, as opposed to the novel, play or poem? What sorts of readers are addressed by these stories and what questions do they force us to ask about those readers? How do the language of the text and the process of translation affect the types of communities a text addresses and supports? How does the short story form evolve over time, and where is it going in the 21st Century?

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Introduction to Short Fiction
195:135:05; Index 18046; M7 (6:40 PM – 8:00)                                            TIL-204; LIV
W7 (6:40 PM – 8:00)                                           TIL-125; LIV
Instructor:  Anderson
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

What is unique to the experience of reading a short story? In what ways can a short story do what a novel or a poem cannot? In this class we will look at the unique importance of the short story form for genres like realism, protest fiction, horror, magical realism, science fiction, and mystery. The first half of the course will trace the development of the short story form through famous works by writers like Poe, Kafka, Maupassant, and Faulkner. In the second half of the course we will read a wide selection of the most exciting short stories from the last fifty years. We will consider how writers like Diaz, Rivera Valdez, or Nabokov use the short story form to capture the extraordinary experience of everyday life. Conversely, in the magical realism of García Márquez, Cortázar, and Carpentier, we will explore the ways in which everyday life becomes fantasy. We will encounter the modernist experimentation of Stein and the postmodern play of Murakami and Calvino.

In this course we will learn to analyze literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies. Because we will be reading short stories from across the globe, we will pay particular attention to issues of translation and adaptation.

Historically, the short story has been a form shaped by its ability to entertain and delight. It has also been a privileged means of posing problems for critical reasoning and analysis. Both of these goals depend on the dedication and engagement that you yourself bring to the stories as a reader.

Course Requirements:
1. Participation:                             10%
2. In-class writings:                      20%
3. Two short papers:                    40%
4. Final comparative paper:        30%
Total:                                              100%

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Introduction to Short Fiction
—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:135:90; Index 03390
$100 Online Course Support Fee.
Go to http://e.college.rutgers.edu
Hours by arrangement
Instructor:  Hsieh
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

The novella, short story, and short novel in Western and non-Western literary traditions.  Authors: Boccaccio, Kleist, Hoffmann, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Mann, Kafka, Gide, and Akutagawa. 

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World Mythology
195:150:01; Index 04651; TTh5 (2:50 PM – 4:10)                                         SC-102; CAC
Instructor:  Segura

Story, structure, and meaning in myths of many cultures. Myth as a primary literary phenomenon, with some attention to anthropological and psychological perspectives.

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World Mythology
195:150:02, Index 00205; TF1 (8:10 AM – 9:30)                                         MU-212; CAC
Instructor:  Troiano

Through the reading representative myths from a broad range of historically and culturally diverse societies, students will become familiar with the variety of cultural approaches to mythology, while exploring a number of analytic strategies that attempt to understand the meanings and uses of mythology.

Course Requirements:
Exams (2)                                                          2 x 200 = 400                      40%
One-page response papers (10)              10 x 25 = 250                        25%
Final Paper Presentation                              1 x 50 = 50                             5%
Four-page final paper                                    1 x 100 = 100                      10%
Attendance & Participation                          28 x 7 = 200 (196+4)            20%
Total possible points  = 1000                      100%

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World Mythology
195:150:03; Index 04572; TF3 (11:30 AM – 12:50)                                      SC-206; CAC
Instructor:  Segura

Story, structure, and meaning in myths of many cultures. Myth as a primary literary phenomenon, with some attention to anthropological and psychological perspectives.

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World Mythology
195:150:04; Index 03121; MTh1 (8:40 AM – 10:00)                                     ARC-108; BUS
Instructor:  Aloo

Story, structure, and meaning in myths of many cultures. Myth as a primary literary phenomenon, with some attention to anthropological and psychological perspectives.

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World Mythology
195:150:05; Index 04446; MW5 (3:55 PM – 5:15)                                        FS-101; D/C
Instructor:  Sokowski

"Myth" is a term that is difficult to stably define:  it means both the dominant religious figures and stories of a culture (as in Greek, Roman, or Norse mythology), AND something that can be proven to be false (as in "Mythbusters").  Yet myths are stories that we just cannot stop telling, whether it's true or not, because it seems to serve a deeper psychological and sociological function.  

In this introductory course, we will attempt to stabilize this definition by looking at a variety of texts from ancient to modern times that are from literature, philosophy/theory, and anthropology.  We will consider various categories of the traditional notion of myth: in the hero narrative, creation/destruction myths, and stories from fertility cults.  We will then look at how myth may function in the modern world in advertising, films, and even social media.  Lastly, we will explore the contemporary fascination with zombies, and how one anthropologist debunks this myth, while discovering a community with a certain ideology and material circumstances that make this phenomenon possible.  A brief study of the voodoo pantheon can finally revise our previous conceptions of ancient and modern myths.     

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World Mythology
195:150:06; Index 05114; TF3 (12:35 PM – 1:55)                                       HCK-210; D/C
Instructor:  Troiano
Open only to freshmen

Through the reading representative myths from a broad range of historically and culturally diverse societies, students will become familiar with the variety of cultural approaches to mythology, while exploring a  number of analytic strategies that attempt to understand the meanings and uses of mythology.

Course Requirements:
Exams (2)                                                              2 x 200 = 400                     40%
One-page response papers (10)                      10 x 25 = 250                    25%
Final Paper Presentation                                       1 x 50 =  50                       5%
Four-page final paper                                         1 x 100 = 100                     10%
Attendance & Participation                                   28 x 7 = 200 (196+4)      20%
Total possible points  = 1000                  100%

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World Mythology
195:150:07; Index 12429; TTh7 (6:10 PM – 7:30)                                         SC-103; CAC
Instructor:  Uhlirova
Open only to freshmen

You will be introduced to various world cultures through reading and discussing their myths. You will become familiar with basic archetypes as they appear in these myths; we will especially explore myths focusing on Creation, the Great Goddess and the Hero Quest. The focus of the course is on interpretation of the meaning of the chosen texts, but you will at the same time become better at deciphering the meaning/s of stories and myths outside of this course. In addition to exploring ancient and foreign cultures, we will also try to think about the contemporary culture and society in terms of its stories and values.

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World Mythology – THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:150:90; Index 17391                                                                  
Hours by arrangement
$100 Online Course Support fee
Go to http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Instructor:  Gonzagowski

In this course, we will examine the form and content of myths from various countries and eras, with particular emphasis on the mythology surrounding the notion of the hero and heroine.  The works cover a wide variety of genres including: drama, epic poetry, oral tales, the anecdote, the essay, and film. The main focus is on the representation of the hero/heroine, which will be examined through various theoretical lenses including psychoanalysis, sociology, and gender theory.

Course Requirements
Participation (Discussion Boards and Online Learning Activities):        30%
Quizzes:                          `                                                                                   15%
Close Reading Papers (2-4 pages each):                                                  30%
Final paper   (7-9 pages):                                                                                25%
Total:                                                                                                                  100%

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World Mythology - THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:150:91; Index 18043                                                                  
Hours by arrangement
$100 Online Course Support fee
Go to http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Instructor:  Gonzagowski

In this course, we will examine the form and content of myths from various countries and eras, with particular emphasis on the mythology surrounding the notion of the hero and heroine.  The works cover a wide variety of genres including: drama, epic poetry, oral tales, the anecdote, the essay, and film. The main focus is on the representation of the hero/heroine, which will be examined through various theoretical lenses including psychoanalysis, sociology, and gender theory.

Course Requirements

Participation (Discussion Boards and Online Learning Activities):      30%
Quizzes:                          `                                                                                 15%
Close Reading Papers (2-4 pages each)                                                 30%
Final paper   (7-9 pages)                                                                               25%
Total:                                                                                                                100%
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Masterworks of Western Literature
195:203:01; Index 09395; TTh5 (3:55 PM – 5:15)                                         TH-101; D/C
Instructor:  Mangold

The crime story has been a mainstay in the western literary tradition.  Criminals and detectives rank among the tradition’s most compelling characters, and the need to solve a crime immediately offers a suspenseful plot.  In this course we will read or view works by Sophocles, Plato, Dante, Shakespeare, Poe, Dostoevsky, Akutagawa, and David Simon, looking for clues as to why the crime story occupies such a prominent place in the western canon and contemporary cultural imagination.     

Some questions we will address in our survey include: what kinds of heroes, anti-heroes, and villains do we find in stories of crime?  How is society affected by violence, transgression and acts of detection?  How do the genres of drama, the epic, lyric poetry, the short story, the novel, and narrative television deal with crime differently? What is the truth status of evidence, the confession, the witness narrative, the prosecutor’s rhetoric? How do gender and sexuality relate to violence and the law?  Finally, how do creative works structured by crime and detection help readers consider the nature of justice?   

Course Requirements:
1. Two short papers (3-4 pages) addressing issues in a single work
2. One longer comparative paper addressing two or more works (5-7 pages)
3. Oral presentation
4. Quizzes and in-class writing assignments

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Masterworks of Western Literature
195:203:02; Index 13480; TF3 (12:35 PM – 1:55)                                      WAL-203; D/C
Instructor:  De Witte             

In this course we will read some classics of modern dramatic literature produced in Europe in the period 1880-1950. We will consider what questions “modern” drama poses to itself and its audience.  The approach in class will combine close reading and textual analysis of each play with an effort at contextualizing the works in a historical framework. 

We will investigate the theater as a mode of representation that both reflects and negotiates its cultural conditions. We will examine major trends and developments of modern drama, starting with three classics of the “realist” theater by Henrik Ibsen (Norway), August Strindberg (Sweden), and Anton Chekhov (Russia).  We will then turn to some of the most striking ideological and aesthetic departures from this model of theater, ranging from the “symbolist,” “aestheticist” and “proto-surrealist” work of Maurice Maeterlinck (Belgium), Alfred Jarry (France) and Oscar Wilde (Ireland), and the “proto-expressionist” work of Frank Wedekind (Germany), over the provocative works and theories of Bertold Brecht (Germany) and Antonin Artaud (France) to end by analyzing landmark plays by Federico Garcia Lorca (Spain), the “existentialist”  Jean Paul Sartre (France) and the “absurdist” Samuel Beckett (Ireland) and Jean Genet (France). These various “-isms,” while not always helpful +to clarify matters, do matter – as we will see –  in our discussion of “modern drama” as a genre that is constantly involved in a quest for representing modern life in ever new ways.

Course Requirements:
1. Three short papers (2-3 pages) addressing issues in a single work, or comparing two works
2. Final comparative paper addressing two works (5-7 pages)
3. Group presentation
4. Class attendance and participation

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Introduction to World Literatures in English - Literature of Colonial Caribbean Atlantic
195:216:01; Index 16122; MTH2 (9:50 AM – 11:10)                                    SC-214; CAC
Instructor:  Stephens
Cross-listed with: 01:351:216:01; 01:595:212:01
Credit not given for both this course and 01:351:216

This course explores the formation of a colonial Caribbean imaginary shaped by the forces of hemispheric and intercontinental travel, trade, conquest, slavery and colonialism. Emphasizing the global context within which Caribbean literary traditions emerged and developed, we will read works of poetry, drama, fiction & prose by a wide range of authors who lived through the moment of intercultural contact between Europeans and the peoples of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Caribbean literature and literature on the Caribbean, written in English, will be placed in dialogue with literature from North America, Europe, and the non-English speaking regions of the Caribbean archipelago.

Required Texts:
The Tempest (Norton Critical Editions) by William Shakespeare
Oroonoko (Penguin Classics) by Aphra Behn
I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem by Maryse Condé
Zong! by M. NourbeSe Phillip
Secret History; or, The Horrors of St. Domingo and Laura by Leonora Sansay
The Pagoda by Patricia Powell
& Handouts in class or posted on sakai.

Movie Screenings:
The Tempest (2010)
The Crucible (1996)

Course Requirements:
1. Mandatory attendance and participation                                                                                                                (10%)
2. A film analysis (on The Tempest or The Crucible)                                                                                               (10%)
3. A literary analysis final paper: (On Behn’s Oronooko, or I, Tituba, or Secret History or The Pagoda)(30%)
4. A midterm and final exam (25% each)

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Introduction to the Literatures of South Asia
195:243:01; Index 16441; MTh1 (8:40 AM – 10:00)                     LRB-110A; LIV
Instructor:  Mani                                                             
Cross-listed with: 01:013:231:01

Fulfills Core Learning Goals AHo, AHp

South Asia as a region includes the Republic of India; the two modern nations that were formerly part of the Indian sub-continent: Pakistan and Bangladesh; Nepal: and Sri Lanka. A single course could never hope to cover the literatures of all of these nations, and this course will concentrate only on the literatures of India up to 1947, the year in which the modern nations of India and Pakistan were formed, with some attention to the question of Hindu-Muslim literary and cultural relations after 1947. During the period covered by the course, “India” occupied different territory and was defined culturally in different ways. We will discuss some of these changes in the definition of India, beginning from the period of the epics through the period of the blossoming of Tamil literature in the South, to the apogee of Sanskrit drama and poetry.

Up to this point the major tradition is what later came to be called Hinduism, with some admixture of Buddhism and Jainism. Then comes the efflorescence of devotional (bhakti) poetry, which is already influenced by Islam. Muslim settlements occurred along the Western coast of India already before 711, and a major Muslim invasion of the Punjab occurred from about 1000 C.E. Persian poetry came to India along with Islam, issuing in a tradition of poetry written in Persian that lasted several centuries, Persian poetry eventually blending with Indian traditions to issue in Urdu poetry—a tradition that flourished well into the nineteenth century, culminating in the ghazals of Ghalib, and that is still alive today in parts of India, and in Pakistan. The one twentieth-century literary text, a long short story by the Nobel-Prize-winner Rabindranath Tagore, is an example of one modern literary tradition: Bengali. The fate of Urdu as a literary tradition in India is discussed in the final text of the course, a contemporary film directed by Ismail Merchant.

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Introduction to Mythology

195:244:01; Index 07681; MTh1 (8:10 AM – 9:30)                                      MU-301; CAC
Instructor:  Cihan-Artun
Credit not given for both this course and 01:351:244

This course aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to critically engage with myths, ancient and modern alike. To this end, students will get acquainted with major theoretical perspectives on myths and will be expected to discuss the relevance of these perspectives through the analysis of works of literature and visual material. Definitions and functions of myth, recurring themes thereof (such as creation, rites of passage, death and rebirth), myths’ relationship with the sacred, the self, and society, and last but not least, the relevance of myths for popular culture will be explored throughout the semester. Students are expected to think across national literatures and cultures and to consider the relationship of literary texts and theory to other disciplines and media.

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Introduction to Mythology

195:244:02; Index 09259; MW4 (1:10 PM – 2:30)                         CA-A2; CAC
Credit not given for both this course and 01:351:244
Instructor:  Sclafani

Throughout history myths have been passed on using various means, from storytelling and performance to all forms of written texts.  Since the start of the 20th century, film has become the newest and in some ways most powerful medium through which myths are transmitted.  In this course we will explore how film communicates the myths of a given society to its members.  By combining the study of myth theories with film analysis, we will attempt to explore the ways in which films both influence and reflect the way we think, and why movies are much more than “just entertainment”.

The first part of the course focuses on three major theoretical approaches to the study of myth: Jung and his theory of the collective unconscious, Levi Strauss’ structuralism, and the understanding of myth as ideology.  Though there are many others, these three approaches are particularly applicable to the analysis of film, and can help us to analyze its “mythic impact”.  During the remainder of the semester we will view films that transmit myths of heroes and of monsters in both Hollywood and non-Hollywood cinema.  After each section students will present a film of their own choosing, using the theories we’ve discussed to examine the way it works as myth. 

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Introduction to Mythology - THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:244:90; Index 17392          
Hours by arrangement
$100 Online Course Support fee
Go to http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Instructor:  Toymentsev
Myths of various cultures; their structures and functions in social and especially literary contexts.

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Introduction to Mythology - THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:244:91; Index 18044          
Hours by arrangement
$100 Online Course Support fee
Go to http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Instructor:  Sclafani

Throughout history myths have been passed on through a variety of methods, from storytelling and performance to all forms of written texts.  Since the start of the 20th century, film has become the newest and in some ways most powerful medium through which myths are transmitted.  In this course we will explore how, through both content and form, film communicates the myths of a given society to its members.  By combining the study of myth theories with film analysis, we will attempt to explore the ways in which films both influence and reflect the way we think, and why movies are much more than “just entertainment”.

This course will be administered online through an ecollege course shell.  Though we do not have scheduled class periods it is still a full 3-credit course and will require approximately 10 hrs of work per week.  This includes the time spent in lieu of class, viewing instructor presentations and participating in online discussions, as well as completing assigned activities and watching films.  The online format is as rigorous as its face-to-face version and has the advantage of offering students more flexibility.  It is also highly interactive, centering on group discussions and individual communication between students and teacher.

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Modern Literatures of South Asia
195:249:01; Index 11974; TTh5 (3:20 PM – 4:40)                           BE-219; LIV
Instructor:  Nerlekar                                                    
Cross-listed with 01:013:331:01 and 01:351:371:01
The course readings and discussions are in English.
Credit not given for both this course and 01:013:331

Fulfills Core Learning Goals AHo, AHp

This class on South Asian literature seeks to explore texts that grapple with diverse forces of colonialism, tradition and modernity over the course of various historical and social movements of the last one hundred years in India. The readings are a combination of Anglophone texts and texts in English translation from regional languages and all the texts highlight different ways in which the society and literature of India has grappled with the question of national identity. Through this intensive reading of Indian literature in English, the class will encounter the various social processes and the disparate cultural pressures that mold the worldview of Indian writers of the twentieth and the twenty first century. This study will span all the major genres of fiction, drama and poetry and it will range from texts published at the beginning of the 20th century to ones that were published in 2009. The course readings and discussions are in English.

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Introducing Italy, City by City - Introducing Italy
195:256:01; Index 17888; TTh5 (2:50 PM – 4:10)                        MU-211; CAC
Instructor:  White                                                   
Cross-listed with 01:560:256:01
Taught in English
Credit not given for this course and 01:560:256.

Taught in English, this course explores the culture of Venice, from its origins to modern days, starting with its geographical configuration, the demographic composition, the foreign communities, the government, the economy, the spice trade, diplomacy and more.

We will use literary texts, images of art, and musical pieces. We will read various types oftheatrical genres produced over the centuries and view many excerpts of movies involving Venice. Reading selections from Marco Polo, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Bembo, Veronica Franco, Philippe de Commines, Goldoni, Casanova, Da Ponte, Pirandello and Pasinetti. Images of great artists such as Titian, Bellini, Carpaccio, Canaletto and more will be included as will be passages from major composers such as Vivaldi and more. We will also analyze different views of Venice as presented in movies such as Visconti’s Senso and Death in Venice, Lean’s Summertime, Fellini’s Casanova, Softly’s Wings of the Dove, Young and Guest’s 007 From Russia with Love. No Knowledge of Italian is required.

Learning Goals
At the end of the course, students will be able identify and describe crucial historical
developments of the Italian society and culture and to understand the main aspects of political and artistic movements, They will be able to critically analyze and interpret individual art and literature in themselves and in relation to their specific historical, social, and cultural context. Students will demonstrate the ability to express and communicate effectively complex ideas concerning the historical nature of cultural production in standard written and oral English.

Departmental Goal II: Cultural Proficiency

This course satisfies the Core Curriculum Learning Goal: AH (o and p).
Area of Inquiry C: Arts and Humanities
Goals o and p:o. Examine critically theoretical issues concerning the nature of reality, human experience, knowledge, value, and the cultural production related to the topics addressed.
p. Analyze arts and literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values,
languages, cultures, and technologies.

Required Text:
A Reader will be made available by the instructor.

Course Requirements
:
The abilities defined in the learning goals will be assessed through oral and written activities.

1. Active class participation (25%); Students are expected to actively participate in class
discussions demonstrating analytical capabilities and attentiveness.

2. 4-page paper (25%); Students are required to analyze a literary text discussing using two
introductory texts on the topic chosen. They expected to demonstrate the ability to address and communicate complex ideas in standard written English.

3. Midterm exam (25%); The students are to write one essay choosing from three topics discussed during the first part of the course. Then the students are to compose seven short answers from a list of nine items. The essay will assess the student’s ability to analyze various themes from a social, historical, and cultural perspective while having the possibility to discuss pieces from the literary, artistic, musical, and cinematic genres. The identifications will confirm the student’s ability to decipher details pertaining to these perspectives and genres.

4. Final exam (25%); The exam is comprised of a further developed essay question and nine short answers (from a list of eleven) on the topics discussed after the Midterm.
The essay assesses each student’s progress in the ability to analyze various themes from a social, historical, and cultural perspective while having the possibility to discuss pieces from the literary, artistic, musical, and cinematic genres. The identifications will again confirm the student’s ability to decipher details pertaining to these perspectives and genres.


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Latino and Caribbean Cultural Studies

195:295:01; Index 13375; MW6 (5:00 PM – 6:20)                      LSH-A256; LIV
Instructor:  Martinez-San Miguel                                   
Cross-listed with 01:595:295:01; 01:050:200:02; 01:351:216:02

This course reviews the comparative study of Latino and Caribbean cultural production through aesthetic, historical, sociological and scientific definitions of culture. The class begins with a chronological review of key definitions of culture. The second part of the course reviews some of the key debates in the study of culture in Caribbean and Latinos studies, such as the links between historical experience, ethnicity, race and culture, the quest for and critique of national and ethnic identities, populism and studies on popular culture, the cultural contacts paradigm and hybridity, the multicultural debate, the Culture Wars of the 1980s, gender and queer studies, the study of cultures in displacement, the ethnic turn in cultural studies, the analysis of visual cultures, and the emergence of pop, media and electronic cultures.

Each session will include theoretical readings and cultural texts different disciplinary perspectives. We will read theoretical works by Ferdinand de Saussurre, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bordieu, Raymond Williams, Franz Boas, José Vasconcelos, Fernando Ortiz, Frantz Fanon, Gloria Anzaldúa, Mary Louise Pratt, Sylvia Wynter, Antonio Cornejo Polar, Néstor García Canclini, Shalini Puri, Hayden White, Terry Eagleton, Robin Kelley, Alicia Arrizón, José David Saldívar, and Juana María Rodríguez among others. Cultural texts include: the Créolité Collective from Martinique, Culture Clash, Gigi Otálvaro-Hormillosa, Richard Rodríguez, Pedro Pietri, Lourdes Casal, Ana Lydia Vega, Guillermo Gómez Peña, Josefina López, Luis Rafael Sánchez, Yolanda López, Santa Contreras-Barraza, and Yaoni Sánchez, among others.

Course Requirements:
Spanish reading knowledge strongly recommended. The class will be conducted in English and all the required readings will be available in English. Credit not given for both this course and Comp. Lit 01:195:295.

1. Class Attendance and Participation =10%
2. (3) Reflexiones or 3-4 pages reaction papers = 30%
3. Midterm = 15%
4. (2) essay exams written in class = 20%
5. Pop quizzes = 10%
6. Partial Exam on the day of the final exam = 15%

Course Structure:
Students will read approximately 70-120 pages per week and write brief commentaries on some primary texts. Even though the course is organized thematically, a chronological and geographical approach will also inform class discussions. Each primary text will be introduced through a brief lecture, followed by group discussion.

Required Texts:
Most readings will be available on Sakai. The following books are required readings and are available at the Rutgers Library, at amazon.com and www.barnesandnoble.com:

Tato Laviera. AmeRícan. Houston: Arte Público Press, 2003. ISBN-10: 1558853952, $10.16
Josefina López, Real Women Have Curves. Woodstock Illinois: Dramatic Pub. Co., 1996. ISBN-10: 0871297256, $7.50

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Introduction to Literary Theory
195:301:01; Index 05911; T4 (1:10 PM – 2:30)                          SC-206; CAC 
Th4 (1:10 PM – 2:30)                        HH-A5; CAC
Instructor:  Parker

Required for all Comparative Literature majors and minors
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHo

A first course in literary theory, which will explore the usefulness of the concept of literary genre (poems, plays, and stories) from a comparative and historical perspective.

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Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures and Theories
195:307:01; Index 12560; TTh5 (2:50 PM – 4:10)                                      MU-114; CAC
Instructor:  Walker, J.
Cross-listed with: 01:013:401:01
Fulfills Core Learning Goals 21C A, B, D; and AHo, AHp

Postcolonialism may be defined, following Robert Young, as the perspective provided by theories that “analyze the material and epistemological conditions of postcoloniality and seek to combat the continuing, often covert operation of an imperialist system of economic, political and cultural domination.” In this course we will discuss, through the lens of postcolonial theories, major literary and filmic texts that, as John McLeod puts it, have been “produced by people from countries with a history of colonialism, primarily those concerned with the workings and legacy of colonialism, and resistance to it, in either the past or the present.” The course will use postcolonial theories to discuss the ways in which the literary forms of fiction, film, investigative reportage, and autobiography both depict and question postcolonial realities in nations ranging from Indonesia and India to Senegal and Guatemala.

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Gender, Race, and Textual Imagination - Women’s Lives and Literature

195:308:01; Index 12538; MW4 (1:10 PM – 2:30)                                         FH-B5; CAC
Instructor:  Baldi
Cross-listed with: 01:560:362:01; 01:988:396:03
Taught in English

Fulfills Core Learning Goals AHo and p

This course -- taught in English -- aims at introducing undergraduate students to some of the foremost issues concerning contemporary women’s writing in the Italian context. For a long time such questions have been conveniently forgotten or evaded (i.e. repressed and erased) in literary and critical debates, and most of these women writers are still excluded from the canon. Only in recent years the specificity and significance of these works have been recognized, in both the American and the Italian intellectual arenas, thus provoking an insightful and thorough critical inquiry. The result of this body of research has been the reappraisal and an enriched understanding of pivotal texts, whose novelty and peculiarity had been ignored. These works testify to women’s struggle toward social and economic freedom and the conquest of knowledge, from the end of the 19th century to the present. Some of them also illustrate original models of political engagement. The course will focus on the features of women’s writing that react against women’s marginalization, fashioning forms of resistance to patriarchal culture and defining new models of agency. We will analyze the historical, cultural, social and economic conflicts that these works reflect and denounce.

Learning Goals:
The course aims to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of key cultural, social, and gender issues related to women’s lives and literary production in the Italian context from the late 19th to the present. Through readings, class discussions, and written assignments, the course is designed to foster the development of essential analytical and critical skills that students can apply to diverse historical periods and cultural frameworks.

Departmental Goals II and III: Cultural Proficiency and Professional Preparation.
This course satisfies the Core Curriculum Learning Goal: AH (o and p).
Area of Inquiry C: Arts and Humanities
Goals o and p:
o. Examine critically theoretical issues concerning the nature of reality, human experience, knowledge, value, and the cultural production related to the topics addressed.
p. Analyze arts and literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies.

Required Texts:
• Sibilla Aleramo. A Woman. Translated from the Italian, and with an Afterword by
Rosalind Delmar. Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1980 (ISBN:
9780520049499; pbk), available at the Rutgers University Bookstore, One Penn Plaza
• Grazia Deledda. Cosima. Translated from the Italian by Martha King. New York: Italica
Press, 1988 (ISBN: 9780934977067; pbk), available at the Rutgers University Bookstore,
One Penn Plaza
• Neera, Teresa. Translated from the Italian by Martha King. Evanston: Northwestern
University Press, 1998 (ISBN 0810116626; pbk), available at the Rutgers University
Bookstore, One Penn Plaza
• A Reader will be made available by the instructor and posted on SAKAI.

Course Requirements and Grade Distribution:
The abilities defined in the learning goals will be assessed through oral and written activities.

1. Active class participation (10%); Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions.

2. One oral presentation (10%); Students are required to give a 10-minute presentation on a topic discussed with the instructor. Their performance will be evaluated according to their effectiveness in communicating as well as the thoroughness of their critical analysis of the subject.

3. Two 4-page papers (25%); Students are required to analyze a literary or visual text, discussing at least two sources linked to their topic. They are expected to demonstrate the ability to address and communicate complex ideas in standard written English.

4. Midterm exam (25%); The exam comprises three essay questions on the topics discussed in the first part of the course. It assesses each student’s ability to engage critically with the issues tackled in the course in relation to their historical, social, and cultural background as well as with the theoretical concepts expounded in the course.

5. Final exam (30%); The exam comprises three essay questions on the topics discussed after the Midterm.


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Politics, Literature, and the Arts - Political Thought in African Literature
195:316:02; Index 16451; MW4 (1:40 PM – 3:00)                                LRB-110; LIV
Cross-listed with 01:013:315:01
Credit not given for both this course and 01:790:316
Instructor:  Coulibaly

The African space is characterized by a constant interplay between politics and poetics. Leading African writers like Wole Soyinka and Ngugi wa Thiong’o have been, at the same time, unrelenting political activists. And some of the most prominent heads of state, from Leopold Senghor of Senegal to Julius Nyerere of Tanzania, have left a brilliant record of literary creativity. It is this intersection between political thought and literary imagination that this course is intended to explore by looking at the works of selected African novelists from the 1950s to the present. The approach to the course will be primarily thematic, and topics for discussion will include colonialism and alienation, negritude and other versions of African consciousness, nationalism and nationhood, leadership and political culture, womanhood and feminism, dependency and the class struggle, violence and liberation, and the quest for a new organic order. Supplementary texts for the course will include political science articles and films. The course will have a semi-seminar format, combining lectures and classroom discussion.

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Literary Approach to Sacred Texts-Midrash and Literary Theory
195:318:01; Index 18341; MW6 (4:30 PM – 5:50)                        MH-210; CAC           Instructor:  Yadin-Israel
Cross-listed with 01:563:315:01; 01:840:394:01

The course will examine the intersection of midrash and literary criticism. We will begin with a historical and literary introduction to rabbinic and classical (Greek and Roman) literature, then proceed to examine theories of language and literature in the classical world, and some rabbinic equivalents. Though there are no rabbinic sources devoted to these topics explicitly, there are a number of areas that provide insight into rabbinic positions, including the debate over allegorical interpretation, interpretive techniques applied to the Bible, discussions of the status of Hebrew versus other languages and more. We will pay particular attention to the importance of divine authorship in rabbinic interpretation, and suggest a number of parallels with the changing role of the author and authorial intent in more recent literary theory. Of the ancients we will read selections from Plato, Aristotle, and Longinus alongside an array of rabbinic midrash; of the moderns Roman Jakobson, Barthes, Croce, and others. As noted, the course includes an introduction to rabbinic and classical sources, and all readings are in English--students with no previous exposure to this material are welcome.

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Modern Writers and East Asia
195:333:01; Index 16438; TF2 (9:50 AM – 11:10)                       MU-111: CAC
Instructor:  Serrano                                                      

In this course we will explore the interaction of European and East Asian cultures in the media of literature, film, music and the visual arts at key moments from the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. What was the effect of the encounter with China, Japan and Korea upon English, French, German and Italian artists, musicians and writers? How in turn have the Chinese, Japanese and Koreans adapted European culture to their own ends? We will in part use materials at the Zimmerli Art Museum in order to answer these questions. Students will be evaluated through three writing assignments of 5-7 pages each spread through the semester.

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Literatures of Migration, Immigration, and Diaspora – Caribbean Pluralities and Indo-Caribbean Literature
195:336:01; Index 16445; TTh6 (5:00 PM –6:20)                                      LSH-A256; LIV
Instructor:  Nerlekar
Cross Listed with:  01:595:312:05and 01:351:366:01
Credit not given for both this course and 01:351:366

The Caribbean is stereotyped in the West as the land of sunny beaches and white sands and happy dancing people. The range of ethnicities, languages and cultures that populate this region go unnoticed in this singular visual of the Caribbean as the ideal getaway for Western tourists. This course will explore one important element of this diversity of the region by focusing on the Indo- in the Caribbean. This literature has emerged as an important part of the Anglophone Caribbean only in the last two decades and it highlights the diversity and also the complexity of the concept of the Caribbean. In this course, we will study some major canonical works of the Anglophone Caribbean and also the lesser known Indo-Caribbean writers who write against the grain. Part of this course will also explore the musical tradition of the region and the variations introduced by the Indo-Caribbeans in the local musical forms. Texts might include works by Naipaul, Sam Selvon, Rajkumari Singh, Ramabai Espinet, David Dabydeen, John Agard, Shani Mootoo and others.

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Renaissance and Baroque – Visual Arts, Literature and Political Thought at the Dawn of Modernity
195:340:01; Index 18647; TF2 (9:50 AM – 11:10)                       MU-211; CAC
Instructor:  Lerro

The course intends to show how Renaissance and Baroque are at the basis of the idea of modernity as we intend it today by exploring some of the major issues and trends of the arts, literature and political thought of the 16th and 17th century. We will read classic texts of the humanist tradition (Pico della Mirandola, Erasmus, Martin Luther) to understand the new idea of subject introduced in the 16th century. We will then analyze aesthetic issues in visual arts (Botticelli, Raphael, Titian, Caravaggio, Gentileschi, Velasquez, Vermeer), in literary genre such as comedy (Machiavelli), tragedy (Shakespeare) and the modern novel (Ariosto, Cervantes, Lazarillo de Tormes). We will then explore the birth of the modern political theory and the scientific revolution by reading excerpts from Machiavelli, Hobbes, Descartes, and Tommaso Campanella. In this course, students will also have the opportunity of exploring gender issues in the 16th and 17th century by looking at the so called “courtly literature.” Excerpts from canonical texts such as The Book of the Courtesan will be read along with two less known texts which students will find extremely contemporary in the matters they discuss as well as entertaining: Lucrezia Marinella’s The Nobility and Excellence of Women, and Baltasar Gracian’s On the Art of Wordy Wisdom. In covering such a broad range of sources students will have the opportunity of exploring the richness, complexity, and beauty of the Renaissance and Baroque culture and thus understanding the roots of Modern Europe.

Course Requirements & Grades Distribution:
1. Attendance and Participation: 15%
2. Biweekly Response Paper (4-5 pages)[5 total]: 30%
3. Midterm (7-8 pages): 30%
4. Final Paper (9-10 pages): 25%

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Classical Backgrounds of Literature
195:346:01; Index 16199; MW6 (4:30 PM – 5:50)                          SC-205; CAC
Instructor:  Walker, S.                                               
Cross Listed with: 01:351:317:01
Credit not given for both this course and 01:351:317

Many modern writers have been inspired by ancient writers, and an important dimension of what we call modern culture or civilization is the result of the vital link that has been maintained with significant texts written many centuries ago. The imitation and transformation these ancient texts not only fostered a sense of cultural continuity, but also led to the creation of texts that were themselves resolutely modern, speaking to their own times in a voice colored with classical inflections.
We will study closely several pairings of ancient and modern texts, such as  Euripides' Alcestis and T.S. Eliot's The Cocktail Party or Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra and Plutarch's Life of Mark Antony, and will attempt to analyze how classical texts took on new life at the hands of authors concerned with speaking to their own age. We will also go on to read the ancient texts in the light of the modern concerns and issues raised by the modern ones.

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19th Century Novel
195:354:01; Index 18269; MW6 (5:35 PM – 6:55)                                 TH-206; D/C
Instructor:  Parker
Taught in English
Cross Listed with: 01:420:242:20

Major French Writers in Translation:  Showing and Telling in the French Nineteenth-Century Novel (in English) A selection of French nineteenth-century novels approached from a variety of critical, historical, and theoretical perspectives.  Readings will be drawn from the canon of classic works by Chateaubriand, Madame de Staël, Constant, Stendhal, Balzac, Sand, Hugo, Flaubert, Sand, Zola, Maupassant, Huysmans, and Proust.   Some attention will be paid to French painting in this period as artists and novelists alike sought to challenge the norms governing what could be shown and told.

Required Texts:
The novels will be read in translation and discussion will be in English.  Requirements include frequent in-class presentations, two 5-7 page papers, and a final exam.

Stendhal, The Red and the Black (Penguin)                                  (9780140447644)
Balzac, Cousin Bette (Oxford UP)                                                     (9780199553947)
George Sand, Indiana (Oxford UP)                                                   (9780192837974)
Flaubert, Madame Bovary (Norton)                                                   (9780393979172)
Zola, LAssommoir (Oxford UP)                                                         (9780199538689)
Huysmans, Against Nature (Oxford UP)                                          (9780192823671)

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Odysseus in Literature - Odysseus: From Homer to Kazantzakis
195:358:01; Index 16454; MW7 (6:10 PM – 7:30)                                   SC-215; CAC
Instructor:  DeLaurentis
Taught in English
Cross Listed with: 01:489:358:01
Credit not given for both this course and 01:489:358

Examination of the Homeric figure of Odysseus; his reincarnation and transformation in modern Greek.

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Topics in World Cinema – Film and Society
195:377:01; Index 11157; TTH5 (2:50 PM – 4:10)                                 MI-100; CAC
W78 (6:10 PM – 9:00)                                 MI-100; CAC
Instructor:  Flitterman-Lewis
Cross-listed with 01:354:375:01

Study of a particular region, time period, movement, or theme in world cinema. Specific topic announced at preregistration time. May be taken more than once, if content is different.

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Topics in World Cinema - Bollywood
195:377:02; Index 12925; TF3 (12:00 PM – 1:20)                             LSH-B269; LIV
F45 (1:40 PM – 4:40)                               LSH-B269; LIV
Instructor:  Sen
Cross-listed with 01:013:365:01 and 16:195:522:01
This is an undergrad course with a graduate student component. The following is for undergraduate students only.

India is the second most populous country in the world and has a cultural tradition that has evolved over 5,000 years. It is also the world’s largest film-producing nation, releasing over 900 films every year. Of these, approximately 200 films are made in Hindi in India’s film capital—Bombay. Driven by the growth and spread of the Indian diaspora in recent decades, the popular Bollywood has become a ubiquitous presence in theaters and film festivals across the globe. While remaining India’s most beloved art form, this cinema today is also India’s most visible and fascinating export. Bollywood remains an exceptional industry that has successfully resisted the onslaught of Hollywood films in the country of its birth. These and other factors have contributed in making academic exploration of Bombay cinema a relatively new, but extremely exciting field of study.

What makes Hindi cinema different? How are such a staggering number of films made in India? How do these ‘song and dance’ movies challenge our perceptions of narrative forms? How do Bombay films negotiate the polarities of tradition and modernity? How do they bear the burden of postcoloniality? Despite the plethora of languages and cultures that comprise India, how does Hindi cinema maintain its hegemonic position both within the subcontinent and without? What is the status of Bollywood as a national cinema? These are some of the larger questions with which we will engage in this broad overview.

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Issues in Comparative Literature – The Jewish Graphic Novel                      
195:395:01; Index 05945; MW5 (2:50 PM –4:10)                           FH-A4; CAC                                                      Instructor:  Portnoy
Cross-listed with 01:563:338:01; 01:082:291:01
May be taken more than once.  Content will differ each semester.

This course introduces students to the history of Jewish-Christian relations from the first century of the Common Era through to the start of the twenty-first century. It focuses both on the history of interactions between Jews and Christians – persecutions, collaborations, conversions, etc. – and also on the history of theological stances and popular attitudes. The goals of the course are three-fold: first, to acquaint students with the general outlines of the history of Jewish-Christian relations; second, to help students hone some of the skills of the historian (especially the critical analysis of primary sources); and third, to encourage students to grapple with questions that confront Jews and Christians in the present, questions about history, memory, theological differences, and the potential for dialogue.

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Issues in Comparative Literature -- Russian Avant Guarde Theatre Design     
195:395:02; Index 15103; MTH3 (11:30 AM –12:50)                         ZAM; CAC  
Course meets as Zimmerli Museum                                                        
Instructor:  Rosenfeld               
Cross-listed with 01:860:347:01
Taught in English. No knowledge of Russian necessary.
May be taken more than once.  Content will differ each semester.

Separate sections focusing on comparative, interdisciplinary topics. Specific titles announced at the time of registration.

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Issues in Comparative Literature - Tolstoy
195:396:01 Index 09756; TTH4 (1:10 PM – 2:30)                                    CML-101; CAC
Instructor:  Bojanowska   
Cross-listed with 01:860:331:01
All readings and discussion in English. No knowledge of Russian necessary.
May be taken more than once.  Content will differ each semester.

This course is certified to fulfill Core Curriculum goals WC s-1, t, & v, and AH goals o and p.

Leo Tolstoy--the great aristocrat of Russian literature--was an anarchist, a vegetarian, a pacifist, a schismatic who founded his own brand of Christianity, an untiring engine of public controversy, and a constant nuisance to authorities.  In the course of his long and turbulent literary career, he confronted key questions of modernity in its implications for both individuals and societies.  These questions continue to occupy us to this day.  What should guide us in navigating the stormy whirl of modern life: science, humanism, or religion?  How to live a moral life in a culture that encourages self-interest and self-gratification?  What links homes and homelands, domestic and imperial relations?  What are the physical, social, political, and ethical dimensions of sexuality?  Finally – a question that was never too broad for Tolstoy – what is the meaning of life and how does death tend to put this question in focus?  We will study all of Tolstoy’s major works with the exception of War and Peace.  The texts will include Tolstoy’s major novel Anna Karenina, his autobiographical writings, his short fiction, and his one play.  The course will conclude with a work that has a particular resonance today: Tolstoy's stark tale about the Russian Empire's handling of its Islamic "terrorists," Hadji Murad.

Course Requirements:
1.    Two 6 page essays (each 25% of the course grade)
2.    Midterm (20%) and final exams (25%)
3.    One informal creative assignment, see 10/11 (5%)

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Issues in Comparative Literature - Women Writers of South Asia
BE-201; LIV
195:397:01; Index 09496; MW4 (1:40 PM – 3:00)                                       
Instructor:  Mani
Cross-listed with: 01:013:402:01
Open to all except 1st year.
May be taken more than once.  Content will differ each semester.

Separate sections focusing on comparative, interdisciplinary topics. Specific titles announced at the time of registration. 

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Issues in Comparative Literature - Love & Death in the Russian Short Story
195:397:02; Index 12083; TTh5 (2:50 PM – 4:10)                                        SC-220; CAC
Instructor:  Bojanowska
All reading and discussions in English
Cross-listed with: 01:860:322:01
Credit not given for both this course and 01:860:322:01
May be taken more than once.  Content will differ each semester.

This course is certified to fulfill the Core Curriculum goals AH o, p, and WC s-1, t, v.

A less well-known but equally brilliant counterpart to the expansive Russian novel, the Russian short story has long been praised by connoisseurs and practitioners of the genre, from James Joyce to Raymond Carver.  In this course we will read both the classics and the hidden gems of the Russian short-story tradition from the 19th century to today. Authors will include Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Bunin, Nabokov, Babel, Zoshchenko, Platonov, Olesha, Kharms, Tolstaya, and Ulitskaya.  We will focus on the themes of love and death and explore the rich narrative possibilities that these themes have offered the Russian masters.

The course will have three components.  We will first study the structure of the genre and the critical tools that help us interpret stories.

Second, we will study intertextuality, that is, the phenomenon of stories that “rewrite” or enter a dialogue with earlier stories.  In the third component, we will examine the concept of narrative complication, that is, a particularly inventive play with the genre’s narrative conventions.

Since the readings cover most major modern Russian writers and movements, the course will also appeal to those who wish to get an overview of modern Russian literature.

Course Requirements:
1.  One midterm quiz that checks the completion of the reading assignments:  (15%)
2.  Short essay (4 pages): 20%
3.  Comparison essay (7-8 pages): 35%
4.  Final exam (essay topics handed out ahead of time): 30%

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Issues in Comparative Literature – Literatures of Chaos and Order               
195:398:01; Index 09042; TTH5 (2:50 PM – 4:10)                  SC-105; CAC            
Instructor:  Rennie
Cross-listed with 01:470:364:01
Taught in English
May be taken more than once.  Content will differ each semester.

Considering how the world began has always also meant speculating how it might end. In recent centuries, increasingly, it has also involved thinking about the position of human beings in a physical and moral universe whose structures can no longer be taken for granted. This course examines the ways a selection of writers and philosophers from the Renaissance to the present have represented dramatic upheavals in the physical universe as analogies for crisis and revolution in the realms of history, politics, psychology, science, gender, and the arts.

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Special Topics in Comparative Literature – Post Colonial Caribbean Theater and Performance
195:480:01; Index 16417; MW4 (2:15 PM – 3:35)                                    RAB-110A; D/C
Instructor:  Stevens
Cross-listed with: 01:940:489:01; 01:595:412:01
May be taken more than once.  Content will differ each semester.

The objective of this is to become acquainted with the theatre and performance traditions of the post-colonial Caribbean and its diaspora. Though the study of plays from the 1960s to the present, we will investigate how performance constitutes a special activity that serves to imagine national community as well as how theatre functions as a space for creating and preserving cultural memory. Some of the topics that will organize our discussions will include:

Storytelling and the Oral Tradition
Re-visioning European Dramatic Traditions
Ritual and Carnival
Politics and the Performance of Race, Class, and Gender
Transnationalism, Diaspora, and Exile

Textbook:
Anna in the Tropics by Nilo Cruz, available at Rutgers bookstore (ASIN: B004R12DZI). The rest of the reading selections vary from semester to semester and will be available by PDF on Sakai or on reserve at Alexander or Douglass Library.

Course Requirements & Grade Distribution:
1. Class Grade: (Attendance, daily participation, written homework, pop quizzes)               20%
2. Presentation: (Group reading of a scene from one the plays read in class)                     10%
3. (2) Papers: (Short composition: 10%, term paper: 20%)                                                       30%
4. (2) Exams:                                                                                                                                       40%
5. Total:                                                                                                                                               100%

*May vary slightly from semester to semester.

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Special Topics in Comparative Literature – Feminist Theory                  CML-101; CAC
195:480:02; Index TBD; M45 (1:10 PM – 4:10 PM)                            
Instructor:  Diamond, E.
Cross-listed with: 01:353:496:01
May be taken more than once.  Content will differ each semester.
Feminist Theory and Performance  

"Feminist theory" describes a field of moving, changing discourses, strongly influenced by literary, performance, and film theory, by psychoanalysis and by postmodern and postcolonial concepts of subject and nation. Yet if we take "theory" to be an inquiry into the assumptions and conditions of knowledge, feminist theorizing maintains a recognizable commitment to the analysis of gender in material social relations and across representational systems, especially those that involve writing, politics, scopic pleasure, and the body. Thus, within global perspectives on culture and capital, feminist theorists continue to value site-specific political struggle; and while postmodern philosophy endlessly decenters subjectivity and sexuality, feminism is still concerned with identity, history, and the meaning of women's experience. Over the last decades, African American, Latina, and queer feminists have critiqued the racial blindness and heterosexism of earlier feminist writing. Such critique will greatly enrich our reading and discussion.

To place feminist theory alongside performance is to lend a material specificity to our deliberations. Certain theater and performance texts will clarify basic feminist concerns about the politics of representation, masquerade, spectatorship, agency, identification, the body's texts, and performativity. There are also specific intersections between feminist theory and performance: Irigaray's mimicry of Platonic mimesis; Cixous and Clement's dialogue on hysteria and Cixous' play Portrait of Dora; Anzaldua's borderlands and lesbian transgression and the works of Cherrie Moraga and Peggy Shaw; Patricia Williams’s discourses on race and memory and those of Adrienne Kennedy and Suzan-Lori Parks; Kristeva's theory of abjection and performance art’s bodily defilements--the connections are numerous. Finally, feminists writing theory have often been deliberately performative. From Virginia Woolf to bell hooks, from Irigaray to Trinh Minh-ha to Glenda Dickerson we hear personal, contingent voices addressing and inventing a community of readers while playfully toying with rhetorical conventions.

Course Requirements:
1.) One in-class report
2.) Two essays, one 5 to 7 pages, the second 8 to 10 pages
3.) Regular thought papers on our seminar’s Sakai discussion site.

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Independent Study
195:493:1R; Index 00206
Hours by arrangement
Permission by instructor and department staff

Independent reading under supervision of a member of the department. 

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Honors in Comparative Literature
195:495:1R; Index 06631
Hours by arrangement
Permission by instructor department staff

Independent research on the honors thesis. 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 09 April 2013 12:56