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Faculty Spotlight

NEWS FLASH: We thank Elin Diamond, Professor of English, for 6 great years of service as Graduate Director/Chair of Comparative Literature and we welcome Michael Levine, Professor of German and Comparative Literature, as new Graduate Director/Chair. We welcome back Professor Jorge Marcone to a second 3-year term as Undergraduate Director

Congratulations to the following faculty:

EDYTA BOJANOWSKA has received the 2013-2014 ACLS Burkhardt Fellowship and will spend the year in residence at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Her work in Comparative Literature was recently featured in the Rutgers article "Chekhov, Tolstoy, and Beyond".                                         MICHAEL G. LEVINE has published a book entitled "A Weak Messianic Power: Figures of a Time to Come in Benjamin, Derrida and Celan" (Fordham UP, 2013).                                                 SUSAN MARTIN-MÁRQUEZ, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature, has won National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for 2013-2014.
BEN. SIFUENTES-JÁUREGUI, Professor of American Studies and Comparative Literature, has received the Warren I. Susman award for Excellence in Teaching in 2013.

SPECIAL CONGRATULATIONS to MARILYN TANKIEWICZ, Administrative Assistant in Comparative Literature, who has won the Graduate School-New Brunswick Staff Excellence Award for 2013. Way to go, Marilyn!!

Graduate Student Spotlight

Comparative Literature congratulates DR. SHIRLI SELA-LEVAVI, who successfully defended her dissertation entitled "Guests in their Own Homes: Homecoming, Memory and Authorship in A Guest for the Night by S.Y. Agnon and the Yash Novels by Jacob Glatstein".

Congratulations also to:

DR. ALESSIO LERRO, who successfully defended his dissertation entitled" From Baroque Allegory to Romantic Sublime: Writing, Images, and Subjectivity in Tesauro, Vico, and Novalis".                    DR. MARIA KAGER, who successfully defended her dissertation entitled "The Bilingual Imagination: Joyce, Beckett, Nabokov and the Making of Modern Fiction". Maria is also the winner of a fellowship from Carolus Magnus Fonds, a division of the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds of the Netherlands, and will use the Carolus Magnus fellowship to work on a book proposal and to write two more articles.
MATTHEW MANGOLD,
winner of an "associateship" in the workshop in Scholarly and Literary Translation from Slavic Languages as well as an Individualized Research Practicum through the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center at the University of Illinois.

Congratulations to all!

Read More...

Rutgers Home
Summer 2012

FOR INTERNET COURSES SELECT:
TERM: Summer 2012

LOCATION: Rutgers Online Courses

LEVEL: Undergraduate

SUBJECT: Comparative Literature


Summer 2012
Undergraduate Courses


 

Introduction to World Literature—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:101:B1; Index 85030; 5/29/12 - 7/06/12
Hours by Arrangement
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Online via e-College http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Open to High School Seniors
Instructor: Sokowski
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

Heroes and monsters are more than just good guys and bad guys.  By analyzing these figures, we can learn about the ideologies of the cultures in which these texts were produced.  Heroes show us what qualities are idealized in a given culture, and the paths that heroes follow also show us how these cultures imagine growing up and experiencing rites of initiation.  Monsters can show us even more.  We cannot only see what qualities are demonized, but through these figures we also read anxieties around foreign peoples, gender roles, social change and scientific discovery.

In this course, students will be exposed to various genres from all over the world: poetry, short fiction, novels, drama, and film.  Students will learn to analyze literary figures according to the time and target culture, and will begin to read critically by discerning the ideological values implied through these figures. 

Students will be assessed through participation (which is measured by responses on our online discussion board as well as a personal journal), a written midterm exam, a research project, quizzes on the assigned reading, and a final 5-7 page comparative paper.

Texts to be purchased:
Homer Odyssey (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)  ISBN:  978-0553213997
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein ISBN:  978-0486282114
Tales from the Thousand and One Nights ISBN:  978-0140442892
J. Sheridan LeFanu  Carmilla  ISBN:  978-8562022258
Carlos Fuentes  Aura  (Bilingual Edition) ISBN:  978-0374511715

PDF's available under "Doc Sharing":  Dante Inferno (excerpts),  Noh Drama “Atsumori” and “Dojoji,”  Akutagawa “Dragon:  the Old Potter’s Tale,”  "The Road of Trials" from Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces, The Book of Revelations (excerpt)

Grading
Participation:                                          20%
Quizzes:                                                  10%
Research Project and Presentation: 20%
Midterm Exam:                                       20%
Final Paper:                                            30%
Total                                                        100%

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Introduction to World Literature—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:101:H1; Index 85031; 7/09/12 - 8/15/12
Hours by Arrangement
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Online via e-College http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Open to High School Seniors
Instructor: Levkovitch
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

Why are some works of literature considered “classics,” and why do we feel that it is important to study them? How do we approach texts composed thousands of miles away and centuries ago? How does this distance affect our understanding? What gets lost in translation? Why do authors feel compelled to revisit and even rewrite the classics?
This course aspires to venture out of the “comfort zone” by exploring selections from different countries, epochs, and genres – from Greek tragedy and poetry of pre-Columbian America, to Russian “novel of ideas” and post-colonial magical realist tales – while offering strategies for reading and critical thinking.

The unifying theme that will help us connect this diverse body of texts is “Encounters.” We will examine the ways the writers and the readers of these works perceive and represent the familiar self and try to make sense of an exotic and at times incomprehensible Other, sometimes imposing affinities and sometimes exaggerating dissimilarities. We will also see how stories themselves are encountered and re-encountered, that is, reinvented and appropriated across ages and cultures.
 
Required Texts:
Please purchase the following books. Make sure you get the correct translations, and, if at all possible, please use the editions specified. The texts are listed in the order they will be studied.
Sophocles. Antigone. In The Oedipus Cycle. Trans. Dudley Fitts and Robert Fitzgerald. ISBN 015602764X, ISBN-13 978-0156027649
The Arabian Nights. Ed. Muhsin Mahdi, Trans. Husain Haddawy. ISBN 0393331660, ISBN-13 9780393331660
Fyodor Dostoevsky. Notes from Underground. Trans. Constance Garnett and Ralph Matlaw. ISBN 0452285585, ISBN-13 9780452285583
Akira Kurosawa. Rashomon (1950) – film; please arrange to buy or rent the DVD
Aimé Césaire. A Tempest. Trans. Richard Miller. ISBN-13 9781559362108
 
Grading:
Participation                                                 15%
Quizzes                                                         10%
Midterm Exam                                             20%
2 Response Papers (2-3 pages each)  25%
Final Paper Abstract (200-300 words)     5%
Final Paper (5-8 pages)                           25%
Total                                                            100%

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Introduction to Short Fiction—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE                        
195:135:B1; Index 85032; 5/29/12 - 7/06/12 
Hours by Arrangement
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Online via e-College http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Open to High School Seniors
Instructor: Raterman
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp

In this course, we will learn to think about the structure and themes of works of short fiction.  Our focus will be on the short story form as writers around the world have practiced it for the past two centuries, so we will also learn about the history of this particular incarnation of short fiction.  We will study works from various cultures and use the tools of our course website to practice writing about literature in personally and intellectually relevant ways.

Grading:
10% quizzes
10% film and storytelling recommendations
20% discussion posts
20% research and writing activities
15% midterm paper
25% final paper

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Introduction to Short Fiction—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE                         
195:135:H1; Index 85033; 7/09/12 - 8/15/12
Hours by Arrangement
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Online via e-College http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Open to High School Seniors
Instructor: Fanelli
Fulfills Core Learning Goal AHp
 
Stories are all around us.  We read and hear them in the media, we watch them in films and on television, we tell them to our friends and hear new stories from them. We are always on the lookout for a good story, but what is it that makes a story good? And how do we learn to read and respond carefully and critically to stories that move us?
 
This course will introduce students to a variety of notable short stories from around the globe in order to gain a keen understanding of how voices and experiences resonate and/or individuate cross-culturally, and how our own social, political, and cultural locations influence our readings of such texts. We will concern ourselves with some of the following questions throughout the semester: What is a short story, and how is it different from other forms of literary expression, such as novels or poems? How do literary elements such as plot, character development, setting, and mood develop differently—if at all—in a short story than a longer prose work? What can a short story do that a novel or a poem cannot? How is it restricted, if at all?

To answer these questions, we will begin by examining the roots of the short story genre in fairy tales and fables, and then move through the Middle Ages with selections from Boccaccio’s The Decameron. We will consider how psychological and feminist agendas are uniquely wielded in the short stories of Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Fay Weldon and will explore the more modern and experimental pieces of Gertrude Stein and Franz Kafka. We will end the course with perennial American short story writers, including Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Jamaica Kinkaid, and Louise Erdrich. We will especially consider the ways in which translation affects our reading and understanding of texts and of the cultures from which those texts emanate. Most especially, we will learn how to develop our ideas clearly and persuasively in analytic writing.
 
Readings
Most required readings are posted using the sakai/ecollege portal:
https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal

Please Purchase:
1.Boccaccio, Giovanni. The Decameron. New York: Penguin Classics, 2003.
2.Charters, Ann. The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction. Boston: St. Martin’s Press, 2011.
Readings are collected from the following sources (for further reading):
Carter, Angela.  Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, and Other Classic Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault. New York: Penguin Group, 2008.
Carter, Angela. The Bloody Chamber. New York: Penguin Group, 1979.
Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. Grimm’s Fairy Tales. Barnes and Noble Classics, 2003.
Songling, Pu. Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio, trans. John Minford. New York: Penguin Classics, 2006.
Stein, Gertrude. Writings: 1903-1932. New York: Library of America, 1998.
Weldon, Fay. Wicked Women. New York: Grove/Atlantic, 1997.

Grade Breakdown
:
Presentation:                      10%
Presentation responses: 10%
Class Discussion:             15%
Writing exercises:              15%   
Papers:                                50%
Total                                    100%

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World Mythology—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE                       
195:150:B1; Index 85034; 5/29/12 – 7/06/12
Hours by Arrangement
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Online via e-College http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Instructor: Gonzagowski
Does not count towards major

In this course, we will examine the form and content of myths from various countries and eras, with particular emphasis on the mythology surrounding the notion of the hero and heroine.  The works cover a wide variety of genres including: drama, epic poetry, oral tales, the anecdote, the essay, and film. The main focus is on the representation of the hero/heroine across various cultures, which will be examined through various theoretical lenses including psychoanalysis, sociology, and gender.

Required Texts:  
Available at Rutgers University Bookstore, Ferren Mall, 1 Penn Plaza, New Brunswick:
Belcher, Stephen. African Myths of Origin. Penguin USA ISBN: 9780140449457
Camões, Luís Vaz de. The Lusíads. Oxford UP    ISBN: 9780199539963
Homer. The Odyssey. Oxford UP.  Oxford UP ISBN: 9780199536788
Morales, Helen, Classical Mythology: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford UP ISBN: 9780192804761
Shapiro, Alan. The Oresteia (Aeschylus).   Oxford UP   ISBN: 9780195135923

Note that in addition to the above texts, I have also posted various required shorter readings on the course e-college website.

Grading:   
Participation on Discussion Boards:              30%
Online Learning Activity (excluding quizzes): 30%
Quizzes:                                                                15%
Final Exam:                                                          25% 
Total                                                                     100%

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World Mythology—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE                       
195:150:H1; Index 85035; 7/09/12 - 8/15/12    
Hours by Arrangement
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Online via e-College http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Instructor: Pappalardo  
Does not count towards major

This course will offer a broad, comparative perspective on mythological themes by engaging literary texts from different traditions and eras. Students will appreciate myths in their historical, literary and aesthetic contexts. We will devote our attention to myths from Ancient Greek, African, Mesopotamian, as well as Ancient Egyptian, Mayan, and Indian traditions. The emphasis of this course rests upon cosmogonic myths and myths of origin, as well as topics such as the hero and heroine, the afterlife, the journey, the flood, and the elective couple.

The readings include The Odyssey, The Epic of Gilgamesh, the Popol Vuh, The Egyptian
Book of the Dead, The Recognition of Sakuntala, and miscellaneous African
myths of origin.

Active class participation in the forum and online activities          20%
2 short papers (2 to 3 pages each) (20% each)                              40%
Final paper (6 to 8 pages)                                                                   40%
Total                                                                                                        100%

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Introduction to Myth—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:244:B1; Index 85036; 5/29/12 - 7/06/12
Hours by Arrangement
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Online via e-College http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Instructor: Toymentsev    
Does not count towards major
Credit not given for both this course and 01:351:244.

In this course offered by Comparative Literature Department myth is understood as narratives passed down from ancient times that continue to live in our consciousness. Such narratives represented in various genres (drama, epic, fairy tale, legend, novel, and film) provide us with perfect materials to study human beings’ understanding of themselves and their relationship with the external world.  With such an understanding of myth in mind, we are going to read closely several mythical texts from both Western and non-Western traditions, examine the relationship between these myths and human psyche in the light of anthropology, sociology, narratology, and psychology, explore their influences on art, religion, and philosophy, and study their roles in the development of human civilization in general.

Grading:         
Participation in the Discussion Boards: 25%
8 Response Papers (1-2 pages each)   40% (5% each)
Final paper (7-9 pages)                              35%
Total                                                              100%

Textbooks: The following books can be purchased at RU Bookstore or online (with exact ISBN)
Euripides. Bacchae. Hackett. ISBN: 0872203921
The Epic of Gilgamesh. Trans. N. K. Sanders. Penguin. ISBN: 014044100x
Bedier, Joseph. Tristan and Iseult. Vintage. ISBN: 0679750169.
Plato. Symposium. Hackett. ISBN: 0872200760
Nietzsche, Friedrich. The Birth of Tragedy. Dover. ISBN: 0486285154
Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde. Penguin.  ISBN: 9780451528957

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Introduction to Myth—THIS IS AN INTERNET COURSE
195:244:H1; Index 85037; 7/09/12 - 8/15/12
Hours by Arrangement
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Online via e-College http://ecollege.rutgers.edu
Instructor: Scalafani    
Does not count towards major
Credit not given for both this course and 01:351:244.

Throughout history myths have been passed on through a variety of methods, from storytelling and performance to all forms of written texts.  Since the start of the 20th century, film has become the newest and in some ways most powerful medium through which myths are transmitted.  In this course we will explore how, through both content and form, film communicates the myths of a given society to its members.  By combining the study of myth theories with film analysis, we will attempt to explore the ways in which films both influence and reflect the way we think, and why movies are much more than “just entertainment.”

This course will be administered online through an ecollege course shell.  Though it is only a 6-week class, it is still a full 3-credit course and will require approximately 15 hrs of work per week.  This includes the time spent in lieu of class, viewing instructor presentations and participating in online discussions, as well as completing assigned activities and watching films.  The online format is as rigorous as its face-to-face version and has the advantage of offering students more flexibility.  It is also highly interactive, centering on group discussions and individual communication between students and teacher.

Grading
Your grade will be determined according to a point system.  Every assignment will be worth a certain number of points, and your final grade will be a percentage of the total number.  For example, if there are 1000 possible points and you earn 900, your percentage grade will be a 90, or a B+.  Note that approximately 25% of your grade will be based on participation (which involves timely responses to discussion threads).

Papers: 300 pts (75 pts for short papers, 150 for the long one; 50%)
Online activities: 120 pts  (20 pts per week; 20%)
Participation: 120 pts (20 pts per week; 20%)
Quizzes: 60 pts (10%)
TOTAL: 600 pts

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 March 2013 07:41