Faculty News

Professor Elin Diamond Wins Graduate Student Mentoring Award

Professor Elin Diamond, an internationally-recognized scholar of comparative drama and formerly Director of Graduate Studies in Comparative Literature, has won the 2017 Geoffrey Marshall Mentoring Award granted by the Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools.

This award is given in memory of Geoffrey Marshall, former President of the NAGS, for outstanding support of a graduate student or graduate students from course completion through research and placement. Criteria include: provision of sound advice with respect to course of study; encouraging the best performance from students; generosity of time or other measures of effort at mentoring; assisting students through to successful completion and placement; advice and other assistance regarding quality and quantity of student papers or other forms of publication and performance; extraordinary efforts or success with placement.

The Rutgers Program in Comparative Literature nominated Professor Diamond in recognition of her outstanding effort as a mentor, especially during her years of service as Graduate Director, as well as for her work on behalf of students in her home department, English. Many of her former students wrote eloquent accounts of Elin's dedication to their professional personal and progress.

Professor Ben. Sifuentes‐Jáuregui Appointed Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Academic Affairs

As Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, Professor Sifuentes-Jáuregui will be responsible for ensuring that Rutgers-New Brunswick maintains its strength in traditional undergraduate education, while developing new models that integrate classroom education with experiential learning, and that anticipate and prepare our students for the world to come. As Vice Chancellor he will oversee and further develop such signature academic programs as the Byrne Seminars and the Aresty Research Center, as well as the Office of Distinguished Fellowships, the Office of Academic Engagement and Programming, the Rutgers Learning Centers, the Office of Disability Services, University Career Services, and the Office of Student Access and Educational Equity.

Professor Sifuentes‐Jáuregui has been a faculty member at Rutgers since 1997 as chair of the School of Arts and Sciences Department of American Studies from July 2006-July 2012. He has also served several terms as Undergraduate Director of the Program in Comparative Literature. He has been the recipient of a number of our highest awards and honors, including the Warren I. Susman Award for Excellence in Teaching and the School of Arts and Sciences Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education. He has been a Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Research on Women and the Center for the Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture, as well as Project Director and co-PI of the Ford Foundation grant, “Writers at the Border: Civic Implications of Latino/a Notions of Border-Crossing.” Professor Sifuentes-Jáuregui did his undergraduate work in Comparative Literature at Yale, where he also was awarded the M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in Spanish-American Literature and Culture.

The author of two books on Latin American literature, gender, and cultural studies, and co-editor of a third on Latin American cultural thought, Professor Sifuentes-Jáuregui has also published numerous articles and book chapters. He has long been fully and actively engaged in the life of the New Brunswick campus and its students in a variety of venues, including his participation in programs outside of American Studies, particularly Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies, Spanish, and Women’s and Gender Studies, to his interest in and enthusiasm for units such as the Tyler Clementi Center, the Rutgers English Diversity Institute, and the Aresty Research Center. His own teaching and research interests include Latin American and Latino cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies, melodrama and questions of national identity, as well as race and psychoanalysis. 

Professor Jorge Marcone Receives 2013-2014 Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education

A distinguished scholar of environmental humanities, Jorge Marcone teaches interdisciplinary courses across three academic units: the Program in Comparative Literature, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and the Center for Latin American Studies.  Over the past five years, Professor Marcone has served as the tireless, dynamic and visionary Undergraduate Director of the Program in Comparative Literature.  During his first three years in this position, the number of majors and minors in the program doubled.  For the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, he has, among other things, been the coordinator and adviser for the Study Abroad Program, taking students to Cuzco, Peru in 2008 and to Salamanca, Spain in 2009 and 2013. One of the students who participated in the most recent trip described Professor Marcone as “an amazing mentor,” adding that he “was a director, a father figure, a friend, a leader, and a teacher.  He was so easy to talk to and went out of his way for 35 people [so we could] experience individual growth in a foreign country.  He took a personal interest in each and every one of us equally.” Professor Marcone’s service to the University has also involved a deep commitment to important aspects of undergraduate life outside the classroom.  Among the many committees on which he has served two deserve special note: one was charged with the review of academic support for student athletes; the other had the important task of helping to hire a new university athletic director.  As is clear from this all-too-brief summary of his many contributions to undergraduate education at Rutgers, Professor Marcone is an all-around guy, or as one student so aptly put it, “Professor Marcone is the man!”

Professor Edyta Bojanowska won the 2013-2014 ACLS Fedrick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship

Prof. Edyta Bojanowska won the American Council of Learned Societies' Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship for Recently Tenured Scholars.  She will spend the academic year 2013-2014 in residence at the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study.  She will be working on her second book, tentatively titled Empire and the Russian Classics (under contract with Harvard Univ. Press), about imperial themes in the works of major Russian writers of the 1850s to the 1900s.  The book will show that, far from an exotic setting in a handful of literary texts, empire was an enduring concern for all canonical writers of the tsarist era.  In the case of some of these writers, their engagement with the problem of empire is largely unknown. We know that the Russians have disagreed robustly about their nation.  This book will show how they have disagreed about their empire.

Professor Janet Walker Wins the SAS Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education, 2012-2013

Congratulations to Professor Janet Walker beloved teacher and mentor of Comparative Literature students, undergraduate and graduate since 1977. More to come...

Comparative Literature Welcomes Nelson Maldonado-Torres, a Core Professor for Comparative Literature

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Professor Paola Gambarota Wins MLA Awards Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Publication Award

MLA's Scaglione Publication Award Presented to University of Toronto Press to Publish Paola Gambarota's "Irresistible Signs: The Genius of Language and Italian National Identity"

The Modern Language Association of America today announced it is awarding its thirteenth Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Publication Award for a Manuscript in Italian Literary Studies to Paola Gambarota, of Rutgers University, New Brunswick, for her manuscript "Irresistible Signs: The Genius of Language and Italian National Identity." The manuscript will be published by the University of Toronto Press.

Professor Ousseina Alidou Wins 2010 Distinguished Alumni Award of the Africa-America Institute

Ousseina Alidou, Associate Professor in the Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures, and Director of the Center for African Studies at Rutgers, was the recipient of the 2010 Distinguished Alumni Award of the Africa-America Institute, a US-based organization dedicated to the promotion of capacity building in Africa through higher education and training. The award was presented to Alidou on December 10, 2010 at the Institute’s Twenty-Sxth Annual Awards Gala in New York City in recognition of her scholarly accomplishments and her work in helping “to shape the material and intellectual lives and perspectives of young people – especially women – from all walks of life, across the United States, in African countries, and in other parts of the world.”

Professor Michael Levine Wins the SAS Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education

 

Prof. Michael Levine wins an SAS Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education.  With his exemplary interdisciplinary teaching in the German, Comparative Literature, and Jewish Studies programs, his visionary leadership as Undergraduate Director of German, and his enthusiastic service on core department and university committees, Professor Michael Levine has made extraordinary contributions to undergraduate education since joining the Rutgers faculty in 2007.  Professor Levine offers an impressive range of interdisciplinary courses that appeal to large numbers of students. Comments on course evaluations repeatedly underscore his effectiveness as a creative, inspirational teacher. Remarking on the diverse, challenging, and illuminating subject matter, one student notes that Michael was “kind and nurturing. It is evident that he is a tremendous intellect who manages to be neither intimidating nor condescending.” Another highlights numerous “epiphany moments” throughout the semester. His exceptional success as a classroom instructor is amply documented by his course evaluations. Statistical indicators repeatedly rank him in the top tier, and student comments are overwhelmingly enthusiastic. These high ratings are even more remarkable in light of the fact that his courses routinely have rigorous syllabi that are theoretically sophisticated, require significant amounts of reading and writing, and challenge students to think in new and unexpected ways.

Michael’s courses have a compelling, profound, enduring impact on his students. One grateful student reports that she refers to the notebook from his Introduction to Literary Theory course as “The Bible,” because “it holds so much information that is somehow relational to my other subjects.” At the departmental level, he has spearheaded curricular innovation at all levels. As Undergraduate Director of German he oversees a flourishing program that has been gaining national and international recognition: under his guidance, three undergraduate German majors have been awarded Fulbright English Teaching Assistantships in Germany next year. At the university level, he has served on key committees charged with improving undergraduate education at Rutgers. Michael also has been instrumental in expanding outreach efforts to area universities and to New Jersey junior high and high schools. With his passionate commitment to his students, to curricular innovation, and to the educational mission of a research university, Michael truly is a “Distinguished Contributor to Undergraduate Education” at Rutgers.

Richard Serrano, Professor of French and Comparative Literature, Wins a Guggenheim for 2010-2011.

The Guggenheim will permit Prof Serrano to complete his third book, Qur'an and the Lyric Imperative.  Prof. Serrano says, "Although the Qur'an was intended to replace poetry at the center of Arab culture, within a century of its first dissemination, elucidation of the Qur'an's difficult words required citation of the very same poetry.  I argue that the dynamic of these contradictory impulses is the primary source of meaning in Arabic literature through the fifteenth century."

Edyta M. Bojanowska, Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature, Awarded MLA Book Prize

In December 2009, Prof. Edyta Bojanowska was awarded the Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for the best book in Slavic studies in 2007-2008 for her Nikolai Gogol: Between Ukrainian and Russian Nationalism, published by Harvard University Press in 2007.  The award is administered by the Modern Languages Association, the largest and one of the oldest American learned societies in the humanities.  It is awarded biennially for an outstanding scholarly work on the literatures or linguistics of the Slavic languages.   The citation for the prize reads:

Nikolai Gogol: Between Ukrainian and Russian Nationalism contains a major new interpretation of one of Russia's most difficult writers. As the subtitle indicates, Edyta M. Bojanowska does not place Gogol in one tradition or the other but instead, in a series of carefully nuanced analyses, discusses how his writings contributed to both Ukrainian and Russian nationalist models. She traces in fine detail the development of his ideas and in the process sheds light on works by Gogol that have generally received less attention from critics. Equally at ease in presenting theories of nationalism and in carrying out close textual readings, Bojanowska has produced a study that will have a lasting influence on future Gogol scholarship.


Prof.  Bojanowska is an assistant professor of Russian and Comparative Literature at Rutgers University. She specializes in nineteenth-century century Russian prose. She received her PhD from Harvard University, where she was also a junior fellow at the Society of Fellows. Her articles have appeared in journals such as Russian Review, Slavic and East European Journal, and Canadian Slavonic Papers.  She is currently working on a manuscript entitled "Imperial Nationalism and Russian Culture." 

Janet Walker - Guest Researcher at Graduate School of Literary Studies of the Free University Berlin

Professor Janet Walker has been invited to be a Guest Researcher at the recently founded Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of Literary Studies of the Free University Berlin from May 16 to July 9, 2010. While in residence at FSGS, she will pursue her own research, which will issue in a public lecture entitled "The Imperial I/Eye: Travel and Identity in Shiga Naoya's Novel An'ya koro (A Dark Night's Passing, 1912-1937)." She will also conduct a mini-course of 1 1/2 days for graduate students, who are writing essentially Comparative Literature dissertations, on Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Ranajit Guha's subaltern theories in relation to the short story of the contemporary Bengali writer Mahasweta Devi entitled "Draupadi." In addition, she will join faculty members of the East Asian Institute in participating in a workshop on translation, presenting a paper on the transculturation of the novel form in Meiji-period (1868-1912) Japan.

Comparative Literature Welcomes Two New Faculty

Comparative Literature welcomes two new faculty, beginning Fall 2009.

Andrew Parker, Professor of English at Amherst College will be Visiting Professor of French and Comparative Literature, 2009-2010. With a doctorate in Comparative Studies from University of Chicago, Professor Parker specializes in literary, psychoanalytic and Marxist theory, sexuality and gender studies, and 19th and 20th century English, European and American fiction. He will teach the graduate course “The Linguistic Turn: Theories of Language for Literary Studies” in Comparative Literature in Fall 09.

Emily Van Buskirk (Ph.D. Harvard) will be a new Assistant Professor in the Department of Germanic, Russian and East European Languages and Literatures, but will do her graduate teaching in Comparative Literature. A specialist in 20th century Russian prose and Czech literature and culture, Prof. Van Buskirk will have an office upstairs from Comparative Literature at 195 College Avenue.

Richard Serrano, Professor of French and Comparative Literature, Wins a Guggenheim for 2010-2011.

The Guggenheim will permit Prof Serrano to complete his third book, Qur'an and the Lyric Imperative.  Prof. Serrano says, "Although the Qur'an was intended to replace poetry at the center of Arab culture, within a century of its first dissemination, elucidation of the Qur'an's difficult words required citation of the very same poetry.  I argue that the dynamic of these contradictory impulses is the primary source of meaning in Arabic literature through the fifteenth century."

Edyta M. Bojanowska Awarded MLA Prize

New York, NY - 1 December 2009 - The Modern Language Association of America today announced it is awarding its eighth Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Studies in Slavic Languages and Literatures to Edyta M. Bojanowska, of Rutgers University, for her book Nikolai Gogol: Between Ukrainian and Russian Nationalism, published by Harvard University Press. Andrew Kahn, of the University of Oxford, is receiving an honorable mention for his book Pushkin's Lyric Intelligence, published by Oxford University Press. The prize is awarded biennially for an outstanding scholarly work on the linguistics or literatures of the Slavic languages, including Belarussian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovene, and Ukrainian.

The prize is one of eighteen awards that will be presented on 28 December 2009 during the association's annual convention, held this year in Philadelphia. The members of the 2009 selection committee were Gabriella Safran (Stanford Univ.); Barry Scherr (Dartmouth Coll.), chair; and William Mills Todd III (Harvard Univ.). The committee's citation for the winning book reads:

Nikolai Gogol: Between Ukrainian and Russian Nationalism contains a major new interpretation of one of Russia's most difficult writers. As the subtitle indicates, Edyta M. Bojanowska does not place Gogol in one tradition or the other but instead, in a series of carefully nuanced analyses, discusses how his writings contributed to both Ukrainian and Russian nationalist models. She traces in fine detail the development of his ideas and in the process sheds light on works by Gogol that have generally received less attention from critics. Equally at ease in presenting theories of nationalism and in carrying out close textual readings, Bojanowska has produced a study that will have a lasting influence on future Gogol scholarship.

Edyta M. Bojanowska is an assistant professor of Russian and Comparative Literature at Rutgers University. She specializes in nineteenth-century century Russian prose. She received her PhD from Harvard University, where she was also a junior fellow at the Society of Fellows and a lecturer in Slavic languages and literatures. Her articles have appeared in journals such as Russian Review, Slavic and East European Journal, and Canadian Slavonic Papers. She has given numerous presentations, most recently at the conferences of the American Comparative Literature Association and of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies. She is currently working on a manuscript entitled "Imperial Nationalism and Russian Culture."

The Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Endowment Fund was established and donated by Aldo Scaglione to the MLA in 1987. The fund honors the memory of his wife, Jeanne Daman Scaglione. A Roman Catholic, Jeanne Daman taught in a Jewish kindergarten in Brussels, Belgium. When deportation of Jews began in 1942, she helped find hiding places for 2,000 children. She also helped rescue many Jewish men by obtaining false papers for them. Her life and contributions to humanity are commemorated in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC.

Comparative Literature welcomes two new faculty

Comparative Literature welcomes two new faculty, beginning Fall 2009.

Andrew Parker, Professor of English at Amherst College will be Visiting Professor of French and Comparative Literature, 2009-2010. With a doctorate in Comparative Studies from University of Chicago, Professor Parker specializes in literary, psychoanalytic and Marxist theory, sexuality and gender studies, and 19th and 20th century English, European and American fiction. He will teach the graduate course “The Linguistic Turn: Theories of Language for Literary Studies” in Comparative Literature in Fall 09.

Emily Van Buskirk (Ph.D. Harvard) will be a new Assistant Professor in the Department of Germanic, Russian and East European Languages and Literatures, but will do her graduate teaching in Comparative Literature. A specialist in 20th century Russian prose and Czech literature and culture, Prof. Van Buskirk will have an office upstairs from Comparative Literature at 195 College Avenue.

Rabindranath Tagore's Concept of World Literature by Professor Subha Chakraborty Dasgupta

Dasgupta thumb
Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012
4:30 p.m.
Rutgers Student Center
Room 410
College Avenue Campus

Professor Dasgupta’s publications and research projects range from world literature
and comparative literature to translation studies, the intersection of oral and written literatures in Bengal, relations between Indian literatures, and modern Indian narrative traditions.
For more information, please contact Marilyn Tankiewicz at marilyn.tankiewicz@rutgers.edu